datefudge "2012-12-01 12:00" date

Fake system time before running a command

Fake system time before running any command.
Sample Output
S?b Dez  1 12:00:00 BRST 2012

1
By: caiosba
2012-06-25 19:41:05

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    0
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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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