ccd () { cd *$1*; }

Substring directory name match cd

If you have long and complicated folder names this might ease your work. add this into .bashrc
Sample Output
$ pwd
/tmp/test

$ ls -1
folder
application
backup

$ ccd up

$ pwd
/tmp/test/backup

0
2012-07-01 10:46:06
cd

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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