sudo shred -vz -n 0 /dev/sdb

Erase to factory a pendrive, disk or memory card, and watch the progress


5
By: bugmenot
2012-08-06 22:37:44

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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