server's host key is not cached in the registry

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0
By: evandrix
2012-09-12 00:22:39

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  • "That's it. Not much to see here. The first command writes any cache data that hasn't been written to the disk out to the disk. The second command tells the kernel to drop what's cached. Not much to it. This invalidates the write cache as well as the read cache, which is why we have the sync command first. Supposedly, it is possible to have some cached write data never make it to disk, so use it with caution, and NEVER do it on a production server. You could ... but why take the risk? As long as you are running a post 2.6.16 kernel,..." Source: http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=3621283&postcount=1


    -1
    sudo sync && sudo echo 3 | sudo tee /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
    StephenJudge · 2012-03-17 08:27:58 2
  • Simple but useful command, I use this for purge an hard disk entry in Virtualbox registry file (is in ~user/.Virtualbox) that persist if I erase a Virtual Machine, so I need to delete it manually.


    -3
    sed -i '/Centos/d' VirtualBox.xml
    servermanaged · 2009-05-05 13:03:55 2
  • This command will bypass checking the host key of the target server against the local known_hosts file. When you SSH to a server whose host key does not match the one stored in your local machine's known_hosts file, you'll get a error like " WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" that indicates a key mismatch. If you know the key has legitimately changed (like the server was reinstalled), a permanent solution is to remove the stored key for that server in known_hosts. However, there are some occasions where you may not want to make the permanent change. For example, you've done some port-forwarding trickery with ssh -R or ssh -L, and are doing ssh user@localhost to connect over the port-forwarding to some other machine (not actually your localhost). Since this is usually temporary, you probably don't want to change the known_hosts file. This command is useful for those situations. Credit: Command found at http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-disable-ssh-host-key-checking.html. Further discussion of how it works is there also. Note this is a bit different than command #5307 - with that one you will still be prompted to store the unrecognized key, whereas this one won't prompt you for the key at all.


    10
    ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no username@host
    dmmst19 · 2012-04-20 01:54:04 0
  • This command telnet and and looks for a line starting with "SSH" - works for OpenSSH since the SSH banner is something like "SSH-2.0-OpenSSH_6.0p1 Debian-4+deb7u3". Then it triggers an action accordingly. It can be packed as a script file to echo 0/1 indicating the SSH service availability: if [[ "$(sleep 1 | telnet -c <host> <port> 2>&1 | grep '^SSH')" == SSH* ]]; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi; Alternative uses: Trigger an action when server is UP (using &&): [[ "$(sleep 1 | telnet -c <host> <port> 2>&1 | grep '^SSH')" == SSH* ]] && <command when up> Trigger an action when server is DOWN (using ||): [[ "$(sleep 1 | telnet -c <host> <port> 2>&1 | grep '^SSH')" == SSH* ]] || <command when down>


    0
    $if [[ "$(sleep 1 | telnet -c <host> <port> 2>&1 | grep '^SSH')" == SSH* ]]; then <command when up>; else <command when down>; fi;
    paulera · 2016-02-02 13:06:51 2

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