lspv

To display the number of hard disks on your system

The lspv command displays the information about the physical volume if the specific physical volume name is specified. If you do not add flags to the lspv command, by default all the available physical volumes are printed along with the following information: * Physical disk name. * Physical volume identifiers (PVIDs). * The volume group, if any, that the physical volume belongs to or the label,if any, locked with the lkdev command. * The state of the volume group. Active-When the volume group is varied on. Concurrent-When the volume group is varied on in the concurrent mode. Locked-When the physical volume is locked with the lkdev command. **************************************************************************************** In the example, the iw406 system has two hard disks. Phy disk name Phy vol identfrs (PVIDs) volume group State of Volumne group hdisk0 00f6267c8a99c7b6 rootvg active hdisk1 00f6267cb3746d01 appinstvg active hdisk0 is mounted on volume group rootvg. hdisk1 is mounted on volume group appinstvg
Sample Output
[pmserver@]:/u/pmserver
:$lspv
hdisk0          00f6267c8a99c7b6                    rootvg          active              
hdisk1          00f6267cb3746d01                    appinstvg       active  

-3
2012-09-13 15:20:06

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