tail -1000 `ls -ltr /var/log/CF* |tail -1|awk '{print $9}'`|cut -d "," -f 17|sort|uniq -c |sort -k2

count & sort one field of the log files

count & sort one field of the log files , such as nginx/apache access log files .

0
2012-11-30 16:30:41

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  • This one has a better performance, as it is a one pass count with awk. For this script it might not matter, but for others it is a good optiomization.


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    1
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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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