Best SSH options for X11 forwarding

alias ssh-x='ssh -c arcfour,blowfish-cbc -XC'

2
By: hute37
2013-01-20 17:10:53

These Might Interest You

  • Run GUI apps on another machine remotely through SSH. -C is for data compression and -X enables X11 forwarding.


    -2
    ssh -C -X user@remotehost gui_command
    sharfah · 2009-05-21 17:52:24 1
  • When you remotely log in like "ssh -X userA:host" and become a different user with "su UserB", X-forwarding will not work anymore since /home/UserB/.Xauthority does not exist. This will use UserA's information stored in .Xauthority for UserB to enable X-forwarding. Watch http://prefetch.net/blog/index.php/2008/04/05/respect-my-xauthority/ for details.


    1
    su username -c "xauth add ${HOSTNAME}/unix:${DISPLAY//[a-zA-Z:_-]/} $(xauth list | grep -o '[a-zA-Z0-9_-]*\ *[0-9a-zA-Z]*$'); bash"
    michelsberg · 2010-04-02 10:08:25 0
  • Protects your secret identity with a passphrase. OSX 10.6 automatically does key forwarding and can store the passphrase in the keychain. For other OSes, use ssh -A or set ForwardAgent in ssh_config to enable forwarding. Then use ssh-agent/ssh-add. Show Sample Output


    3
    ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa -p
    darkfader · 2010-07-19 12:53:35 0
  • This command will bypass checking the host key of the target server against the local known_hosts file. When you SSH to a server whose host key does not match the one stored in your local machine's known_hosts file, you'll get a error like " WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" that indicates a key mismatch. If you know the key has legitimately changed (like the server was reinstalled), a permanent solution is to remove the stored key for that server in known_hosts. However, there are some occasions where you may not want to make the permanent change. For example, you've done some port-forwarding trickery with ssh -R or ssh -L, and are doing ssh user@localhost to connect over the port-forwarding to some other machine (not actually your localhost). Since this is usually temporary, you probably don't want to change the known_hosts file. This command is useful for those situations. Credit: Command found at http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-disable-ssh-host-key-checking.html. Further discussion of how it works is there also. Note this is a bit different than command #5307 - with that one you will still be prompted to store the unrecognized key, whereas this one won't prompt you for the key at all.


    10
    ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no username@host
    dmmst19 · 2012-04-20 01:54:04 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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