grep -hor ofx[a-zA-Z]*.h src/ | grep -o ofx[^\.]* >> addons.make

Add ofxAddons mentioned in source files, into addons.make

ofxGui ofxFX

0
By: egeoffray
2013-03-15 11:29:50

These Might Interest You

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    1
    make -d | egrep --color -i '(considering|older|newer|remake)'
    b_t · 2011-06-03 01:55:08 1

  • 0
    jshon -e addons -a -e defaultLocale -e name -u < ~/.mozilla/firefox/*.[dD]efault/extensions.json
    return13 · 2015-02-17 20:25:23 2
  • Good for when your working on building a clean source install for RPM packaging or what have you. After testing, run this command to compare the original extracted source to your working source directory and it will remove the differences that are created when running './configure' and 'make'.


    0
    diff ../source-dir.orig/ ../source-dir.post/ | grep "Only in" | sed -e 's/^.*\:.\(\<.*\>\)/\1/g' | xargs rm -r
    bigc00p · 2012-10-17 14:12:32 0
  • Much more accurate than other methods mentioned here straight out of the box. Show Sample Output


    1
    sloccount <directory>
    BohrMe · 2011-05-06 13:51:27 2
  • Combines a few repetitive tasks when compiling source code. Especially useful when a hypen in a file-name breaks tab completion. 1.) wget source.tar.gz 2.) tar xzvf source.tar.gz 3.) cd source 4.) ls From there you can run ./configure, make and etc. Show Sample Output


    -1
    wtzc () { wget "$@"; foo=`echo "$@" | sed 's:.*/::'`; tar xzvf $foo; blah=`echo $foo | sed 's:,*/::'`; bar=`echo $blah | sed -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/' -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'`; cd $bar; ls; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:25:47 0
  • An apt-get wrapper function which will run the command via sudo, but will run it normally if you're only downloading source files. This was a bit of an excuse to show off the framework of cmd && echo true || echo false ...but as you can see, you must be careful about what is in the "true" block to make sure it executes without error, otherwise the "false" block will be executed. To allow the apt-get return code to pass through, you need to use a more normal if/else block: apt-get () { if [ "$1" = source ]; then command apt-get "$@"; else sudo apt-get "$@"; fi }


    1
    apt-get () { [ "$1" = source ] && (command apt-get "$@";true) || sudo apt-get "$@" }
    mulad · 2009-02-19 04:17:24 1

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