rsync --progress user@host:/path/to/source /path/to/target/ | stdbuf -oL tr '\r' '\n' >> rsyncprogress.txt

make rsync progress output suitable for shell script reading

This line unbuffers the interactive output of rsync's --progress flag creating a new line for every update. This output can now be used within a script to make actions (or possibly piped into a GUI generator for a progress bar)

0
2013-03-26 11:06:45

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    rsync --recursive --info=progress2 <src> <dst>
    koter84 · 2014-10-21 22:19:44 0
  • Put it into your sh startup script (I use alias scpresume='rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh' in bash). When a file transfer via scp has aborted, just use scpresume instead of scp and rsync will copy only the parts of the file that haven't yet been transmitted. Show Sample Output


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    rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh SOURCE DESTINATION
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  • -r for recursive (if you want to copy entire directories) src for the source file (or wildcards) dst for the destination --progress to show a progress bar


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    rsync -rv <src> <dst> --progress
    fecub · 2011-08-05 09:29:12 4
  • transfer files from localhost to a remotehost.


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    rsync -av --progress ./file.txt user@host:/path/to/dir
    aoiaoi · 2009-02-06 11:51:51 1
  • It can resume a failed secure copy ( usefull when you transfer big files like db dumps through vpn ) using rsync. It requires rsync installed in both hosts. rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file local -> remote or rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $user@$host:$remote_file $destination_file remote -> local


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    rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file
    dr_gogeta86 · 2009-04-01 13:13:14 1
  • The command copies a file from remote SSH host on port 8322 with bandwidth limit 100KB/sec; --progress shows a progress bar --partial turns partial download on; thus, you can resume the process if something goes wrong --bwlimit limits bandwidth by specified KB/sec --ipv4 selects IPv4 as preferred I find it useful to create the following alias: alias myscp='rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4' in ~/.bash_aliases, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login or ~/.bashrc where appropriate. Show Sample Output


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    rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4 user@domain.com:~/file.tgz .
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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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