grep for 2 (or more) words anywhere on each line of a file

grep -E "(.*)(ERROR)(.*)(FAULT)(.*)" log.txt
If you know any two (or more) words are occurring on multiple lines in a file, using a regular expression such as this will help you find them quickly.

0
By: pioniere
2013-05-01 15:45:52

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  • grep for 2 words existing on the same line


    0
    egrep 'word1.*word2' --color /path/file.log |more
    alissonf · 2015-04-28 15:09:45 0
  • The first grep rejects capitalised words since the dict has proper nouns in it that you mightn't want to use. The second grep rejects words with ending in apostrophe s, and the third forces the words to be at least 15 characters long. Show Sample Output


    -2
    cat /usr/share/dict/words | grep -P ^[a-z].* | grep -v "'s$" | grep -Pv ^.\{1,15\}$ | shuf -n4 | tr '\n' ' ' | sed 's/$/\n/'
    bugmenot · 2011-08-15 01:03:48 3
  • The improvement of this command over Strawp's original alternative is that you can specify the size of the words, in this particular case words between 3 and 5 character's long. It also excludes words that contain apostrophes, if you'd rather keep those words simply substitue [^'] for . Show Sample Output


    2
    echo $(grep "^[^']\{3,5\}$" /usr/share/dict/words|shuf -n4)
    j_melis · 2011-08-23 21:15:18 3
  • Suppose you have 11 marbles, 4 of which are red, the rest being blue. The marbles are indistinguishable, apart from colour. How many different ways are there to arrange the marbles in a line? And how many ways are there to arrange them so that no two red marbles are adjacent? There are simple mathematical solutions to these questions, but it's also possible to generate and count all possibilities directly on the command line, using little more than brace expansion, grep and wc! The answer to the question posed above is that there are 330 ways of arranging the marbles in a line, 70 of which have no two red marbles adjacent. See the sample output. To follow the call to marbles 11 4: after c=''; for i in $(seq $1); do c+='{b,r}'; done;, $c equals {b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r}{b,r} After x=$(eval echo $c), and brace expansion, $x equals bbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbr ... rrrrrrrrrrb rrrrrrrrrrr, which is all 2^11 = 2048 strings of 11 b's and r's. After p=''; for i in $(seq $2); do p+='b*r'; done;, $p equals b*rb*rb*rb*r Next, after y=$(grep -wo "${p}b*" Finally, grep -vc 'rr' Show Sample Output


    -4
    marbles () { c=''; for i in $(seq $1); do c+='{b,r}'; done; x=$(eval echo $c); p=''; for i in $(seq $2); do p+='b*r'; done; y=$(grep -wo "${p}b*" <<< $x); wc -l <<< "$y"; grep -vc 'rr' <<< "$y"; }
    quintic · 2010-08-27 23:04:33 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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