Upgrading packages. Pacman can update all packages on the system with just one command. This could take quite a while depending on how up-to-date the system is. This command can synchronize the repository databases and update the system's packages.

sudo pacman -Syu
Warning: Instead of immediately updating as soon as updates are available, users must recognize that due to the nature of Arch's rolling release approach, an update may have unforeseen consequences. This means that it is not wise to update if, for example, one is about to deliver an important presentation. Rather, update during free time and be prepared to deal with any problems that may arise. Pacman is a powerful package management tool, but it does not attempt to handle all corner cases. Read The Arch Way if this causes confusion. Users must be vigilant and take responsibility for maintaining their own system. When performing a system update, it is essential that users read all information output by pacman and use common sense. If a user-modified configuration file needs to be upgraded for a new version of a package, a .pacnew file will be created to avoid overwriting settings modified by the user. Pacman will prompt the user to merge them. These files require manual intervention from the user and it is good practice to handle them right after every package upgrade or removal. See Pacnew and Pacsave Files for more info. Tip: Remember that pacman's output is logged in /var/log/pacman.log.
Sample Output
:: Synchronizing package databases...
 core                                                   112.4 KiB   465K/s 00:00 [##############################################] 100%
 extra                                                 1472.8 KiB   629K/s 00:02 [##############################################] 100%
 community                                             1939.5 KiB   682K/s 00:03 [##############################################] 100%
:: Starting full system upgrade...
resolving dependencies...
looking for inter-conflicts...

Packages (13): ethtool-1:3.9-1  flashplugin-11.2.202.285-1  glib2-2.36.2-1  gnupg-2.0.20-1  gvfs-1.16.2-1  libcap-2.22-5
               libical-1.0-2  libldap-2.4.35-3  libsasl-2.1.26-2  orage-4.8.4-2  pcmciautils-018-7  sudo-1.8.6.p8-2
               syslog-ng-3.4.1-3

Total Download Size:    15.85 MiB
Total Installed Size:   58.75 MiB
Net Upgrade Size:       -0.45 MiB

:: Proceed with installation? [Y/n] 

1
2013-05-16 13:49:14

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