date '+%y%m%d-%H%M%S'

Get the current date in a yymmdd-hhmmss format (useful for file names)


0
By: Nickolay
2013-05-26 22:50:58

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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