sort ugly text

sort -bdf
Often, when sorting you want the sort to ignore extraneous characters. The b, d, and f tell sort to ignore leading blanks, use 'dictionary order' (ignore punctuation), and ignore (fold) case. Add a "u" if you only want one copy of duplicate lines. This is a great command to use within vim to sort lines of text, using !}sort -bdf
Sample Output
fc -l | cut -d" " -f2- | sort -bdf
dhclient | grep 6
fc -l
fc -l | cut -d" " -f2-
fc -l | sort -bdf
head passwd
ls
ls
ls
ls /tmp
man dhclient.conf
more /etc/shadow
ps -ef | sort -bdf
ssh gislab63

2
By: sysadmn
2009-02-26 19:55:41

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    0
    gawk 'BEGIN {RS="\n\n"; if (ARGV[1]=="-i"){IGNORECASE=1; ARGC=1}};{Text[NR]=$0};END {asort(Text);for (i=1;i<=NR;i++) printf "%s\n\n",Text[i] }' -i<Zip.txt
    IF_Rock · 2011-05-10 19:08:27 0
  • This function is used to sort selected lines of a text file to the end of that file. Especially useful in cases where human intervention is necessary to sort out parts of a file. Let's say that you have a text file which contains the words rough slimy red fluff dough For whatever reason, you want to sort all words rhyming with 'tough' to the bottom of the file, and all words denoting colors to the top, while keeping the order of the rest of the file intact. '$EDITOR' will open, showing all of the lines in the given file, numbered with '0' padding. Adding a '~' to the beginning of the line will cause the line to sort to the end of the file, adding '!' will cause it to sort to the beginning. Show Sample Output


    0
    2end () ( export LC_ALL=C; nl -n rz $1 > $1.tmp; ${EDITOR:-vi} $1.tmp; sort $1.tmp | sed -r 's/^.*[0-9]+\t+//' > $1; rm $1.tmp; )
    bartonski · 2010-03-06 23:02:28 3
  • Original command: cat "log" | grep "text to grep" | awk '{print $1}' | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -rn | head -n 100 This is a waste of multiple cats and greps, esp when awk is being used


    0
    awk '/text to grep/{print $1}' "log" | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -rn | head -n 100
    kln0thing · 2014-07-09 08:48:06 0
  • Finds files modified today since 00:00, removes ugly dotslash characters in front of every filename, and sorts them. *EDITED* with the advices coming from flatcap (thanks!)


    -2
    find -maxdepth 1 -type f -newermt "00:00" -printf "%f\n" | sort
    TetsuyO · 2013-03-23 12:50:01 4

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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