rsync Command that limits bandwidth

rsync -arvx --numeric-ids --stats --progress --bwlimit=1000 file server:destination_directory
Useful for transferring large file over a network during operational hours

0
2013-10-01 13:00:59

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  • The command copies a file from remote SSH host on port 8322 with bandwidth limit 100KB/sec; --progress shows a progress bar --partial turns partial download on; thus, you can resume the process if something goes wrong --bwlimit limits bandwidth by specified KB/sec --ipv4 selects IPv4 as preferred I find it useful to create the following alias: alias myscp='rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4' in ~/.bash_aliases, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login or ~/.bashrc where appropriate. Show Sample Output


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    rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4 user@domain.com:~/file.tgz .
    ruslan · 2011-02-10 14:25:22 2
  • Limits the usage of bandwidth by apt-get, in the example the command will use 30Kb/s ;) It should work for most apt-get actions (install, update, upgrade, dist-upgrade, etc.)


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    sudo apt-get -o Acquire::http::Dl-Limit=30 upgrade
    alemani · 2010-03-22 01:29:44 1
  • the command is obvious, I know, but maybe not everyone knows that using the parameter "-l" you can limit the use of bandwidth command scp. In this example fetch all files from the directory zutaniddu and I copy them locally using only 10 Kbs


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    scp -l10 pippo@serverciccio:/home/zutaniddu/* .
    0disse0 · 2010-02-19 16:44:24 1
  • This will email user@example.com a message with the body: "rsync done" when there are no processes of rsync running. This can be changed for other uses by changing $(pgrep rsync) to something else, and echo "rsync done" | mailx user@example.com to another command.


    0
    $(while [ ! -z "$(pgrep rsync)" ]; do echo; done; echo "rsync done" | mailx user@example.com) > /dev/null &
    matthewbauer · 2009-08-14 19:46:59 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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