i=1; for f in *.[jJ][pP][gG]; do mv -- "$f" "$( printf "new_name_of_file-%04d.jpg" $i )"; ((i++)); done

Batch rename files from the command line (in this case jpegs)

I wrote a script to make it a bit easier and more flexable: #!/bin/bash #By GrouchyGaijin # Hard part (lines 15 and 21) by Vaphell #Last Updated: 04-Oct-2013 (Friday - yes see what I do on Firday nights) @ 23:37 #Put this in path and call it by typing batchrename in the terminal #Version 0.3 echo "This script is for batch renaming files." read -p "Enter the path to the folder containing the files. " path cd $path read -p "Enter the file extension. " extension echo "Press N if you want to use a new name or D if you want to use the date" read x if [ "$x" = "D" ] then i=1; for f in *; do mv -- "$f" "$( printf "$( date +%d-%b-%Y )-%04d.$extension" $i )"; ((i++)); done fi if [ "$x" = "N" ] then read -p "Enter the new base name: " new_name i=1; for f in *; do mv -- "$f" "$( printf "$new_name-%04d.$extension" $i )"; ((i++)); done fi #OK S11 - change this to Thunar nautilus $path

0
2013-10-08 20:12:57

These Might Interest You

  • Batch rename extension of all files in a folder, in the example from .txt to .md mmv most likely must be installed, but is very powerfull when you want to move/copy/append/link multiple files by wildcard patterns.


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    mmv "*.txt" "#1.md"
    houghi · 2010-12-09 19:14:07 0
  • # Limited and very hacky wildcard rename # works for rename *.ext *.other # and for rename file.* other.* # but fails for rename file*ext other*other and many more # Might be good to merge this technique with mmv command... mv-helper() { argv="`history 1 | perl -pe 's/^ *[0-9]+ +[^ ]+ //'`" files="`echo \"$argv\"|sed -e \"s/ .*//\"`" str="`history 1 | perl -pe 's/^ *[0-9]+ +[^ ]+ //' | tr -d \*`" set -- $str for file in $files do echo mv $file `echo $file|sed -e "s/$1/$2/"` mv $file `echo $file|sed -e "s/$1/$2/"` done } alias rename='mv-helper #'


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    rename *.JPG *.jpg
    gtoal · 2014-03-05 14:54:33 0
  • This command will take the files in a directory, rename them, and then number them from 1...N. Black belt stuff. Hell of a time saver.


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    find . -name '*.jpg' | awk 'BEGIN{ a=0 }{ printf "mv %s name%01d.jpg\n", $0, a++ }' | bash
    doublescythe · 2013-02-07 06:12:37 0
  • This command can be used to rename all the files with extension .xls( in this case) to .ods files. It can be used for other files with certain extension.


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    find / -name "*.xls" -print0 | xargs -0 rename .xls .ods {}
    jagjit · 2011-07-18 12:48:49 0
  • there is no explicit find command in DOS you can create a batch file with this one and find all jpegs on the C drive ... note: if creating a batch file "find.bat" the syntax changes to: for %%f in (c) do dir %%f:\%1 /s /p you can then use find *.jpg Show Sample Output


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    for %f in (c) do dir %f:\*.jpg /s /p
    copremesis · 2009-05-05 18:28:18 4
  • This renames a pattern matched bunch of files by their last modified time. rename by timestamp rename by time created rename by time modified Show Sample Output


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    for i in somefiles*.png ; do echo "$i" ; N=$(stat -c %Y $i); mv -i $i $N.png; done
    sufoo · 2010-06-01 19:28:05 0

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