Get file from remote system

scp username@host|ipaddress:/directory/path .
scp username@192.168.1.22:/directory/path . Get the file from the remote system

0
By: Dhinesh
2013-10-23 12:35:18

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What Others Think

This is too specific scp user@host:/directory/path . is more acceptable
snipertyler · 242 weeks and 5 days ago
Changed to general format.
Dhinesh · 242 weeks and 5 days ago
Hostnames can be used instead of IP addresses derived from DNS or /etc/hosts entries. So user@host/IP is what the original post was getting at. It's nit picking, but this is a very basic command. I do think that this command is still very useful useful for someone without a lot of command line experience.
sonic · 242 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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