mv /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.old && mount | awk '{print $1, $3, $5, $6}'| sed s/\(//g|sed s/\)/' 0 0'/g >> /etc/fstab

fstab update


0
By: cas_alexi
2013-11-26 06:31:27

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