PlayTweets from the command line

vlc $(curl -s http://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/18855500.rss|grep play|sed -ne '/<title>/s/^.*\(http.*\)<\/title/\1/gp'|awk '{print $1}')
This will play the audio goodness posted up on PlayTweets via twitter right form the ever loving cmdline. You do not even need a twitter account. I hashed this out in a bit of a hurray as the kids need to get to sleep....I will be adding a loop based feature that will play new items as they come in...after what your are listening to is over. http://twitter.com/playTweets for more info on playtweets
Sample Output
The sound of the urls being played to you.

-1
By: tomwsmf
2009-03-02 05:36:19

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What Others Think

It has occured to me you do not even need to log into your account as the PlayTweet rss feed has all the info you need. vlc $(curl -s http://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/18855500.rss|grep play|sed -ne '//s/^.*\(http.*\)
tomwsmf · 485 weeks and 6 days ago
vlc $(curl -s http://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/18855500.rss|grep play|sed -ne '/<title>/s/^.*\(http.*\)<\/title/\1/gp'|awk '{print $1}'|head -n1)
tomwsmf · 485 weeks and 6 days ago
hmm something is fraked up with my pastes vlc $(curl -s http://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/18855500.rss|grep play|sed -ne '/<title>/s/^.*\(http.*\)<\/title/\1/gp'|awk '{print $1}'|head -n1)
tomwsmf · 485 weeks and 6 days ago
OK just forget about the botched notes, I folded the thoughts into the command itself.
tomwsmf · 485 weeks and 6 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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