xbacklight -set 50

while using lxde and being blinded by your laptop screen, you can type:

I'm not sure what apt this is, but it seems to work on most X screens, an is useful for saving power, and not straining your eyes
Sample Output
Your screen should change brightness to 50 percent

2
By: gabe240
2014-02-07 12:03:57

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    xset dpms force off
    nesses · 2013-04-26 21:30:10 0
  • this is great if you loose you ssh connection (with out a screen session) or are working on a laptop with a bad battery, or just a power outage. Modifications: you may not need the -print; the mtime is last modified time in days


    -1
    find ./ -type f -mtime -1 -name .*.sw[po] -print | sed -r 's/^(.+)\/\.(\S+)\.sw[op]$/\1\/\2/' | xargs vim -r
    nodnarb · 2010-06-16 13:15:10 0
  • Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.


    4
    echo <percentage> > /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness
    renan2112 · 2010-12-29 13:51:45 0
  • If you know the benefits of screen, then this might come in handy for you. Instead of ssh'ing into a machine and then running a screen command, this can all be done on one line instead. Just have the person on the machine your ssh'ing into run something like screen -S debug Then you would run ssh -t user@host screen -x debug and be attached to the same screen session.


    7
    ssh -t user@host screen -x <screen name>
    Dark006 · 2009-08-02 15:39:24 0
  • This command will let you just type c-a b (which means press 'ctrl' then 'a' then 'b'), and screen will save your copy buffer to /tmp/screen-exchange, and then execute xsel to copy the contents of that file into the system's X clipboard. 1. Install Conrad Parker's xsel from http://www.vergenet.net/~conrad/software/xsel/ 2. Add these lines to your .screenrc # Add cool line to make copying to x clipboard possible. # This binds C-a b to copy screen's copy buffer to the system clipboard. bind b eval writebuf 'exec /bin/sh -c "xsel -i -b < /tmp/screen-exchange"' 'exec /bin/sh -c "killall xsel"' 3. Restart screen. 4. Test it by typing c-a [ to enter copy mode. 5. Select some text using vi movement keys (h, j, k, l, etc...) and starting your selection by hitting the space bar, moving with vi movement keys, and then ending your selection with the space bar. 6. Type C-a b, and screen will use xsel to copy your screen copy buffer to the system's X clipboard buffer. 7. Then you can paste the screen copy buffer into any X program. Note: If you're using Mac OSX, you can use pbcopy instead of xsel. Also Note: The second exec in the .screenrc file, which runs killall on xsel, is necessary, because even when you redirect a file to xsel, xsel waits for you to press ctrl-c to kill it, and have it stop waiting for more input. Since xsel forces screen to wait, and I don't want to press ctrl-c, I send the equivalent of ctrl-c with killall causing xsel to write /tmp/screen-exchange to the X clipboard, and then exit. It's a hack, but it works. If you know how to get this to work without a lame hack leave a comment explaining how. Show Sample Output


    5
    Type "c-a b" in gnu screen after updating your .screenrc (See Description below).
    deeelwy · 2009-05-23 02:10:12 3
  • run it inside a screen session, you send commands to screen itself!


    0
    rlwrap -S "$STY> " sh -c 'while read; do screen -S "'"$STY"'" -X $REPLY; done'
    bandie91 · 2012-04-16 21:49:06 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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