pacman -Qdt -q | xargs pacman --noconfirm -R

Remove orphaned dependencies on Arch

-Qdt Lists dependencies/packages which are no longer required by any packages -q Output only package name (not the version number) -R Remove package(s) Rest is self-explanatory. I just started out with Arch - so if there is any better/standard method to achieve the same - please suggest.

4
By: b_t
2014-02-27 05:17:57

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