alias oath='temp=$(pbpaste) && oathtool --base32 --totp "YOUR SEED HERE" | pbcopy && sleep 3 && echo -n $temp | pbcopy'

Generate a one-time TOTP token, then restore the clipboard after 3 seconds

Typing a word in terminal is easier than digging your phone out, opening your two-factor authentication app and typing the code in manually. This alias copies the one-time code to your clipboard for 3 seconds (long enough to paste it into a web form), then restores whatever was on the clipboard beforehand. This command works on Mac. Replace pbpaste/pbcopy with your distribution's versions.

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