Change host name

sed -i 's/oldname/newname/' /etc/hosts /etc/hostname
With sed you can replace strings on the fly.

1
By: adria
2014-11-02 22:03:48

These Might Interest You

  • This command will bypass checking the host key of the target server against the local known_hosts file. When you SSH to a server whose host key does not match the one stored in your local machine's known_hosts file, you'll get a error like " WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" that indicates a key mismatch. If you know the key has legitimately changed (like the server was reinstalled), a permanent solution is to remove the stored key for that server in known_hosts. However, there are some occasions where you may not want to make the permanent change. For example, you've done some port-forwarding trickery with ssh -R or ssh -L, and are doing ssh user@localhost to connect over the port-forwarding to some other machine (not actually your localhost). Since this is usually temporary, you probably don't want to change the known_hosts file. This command is useful for those situations. Credit: Command found at http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-disable-ssh-host-key-checking.html. Further discussion of how it works is there also. Note this is a bit different than command #5307 - with that one you will still be prompted to store the unrecognized key, whereas this one won't prompt you for the key at all.


    10
    ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no username@host
    dmmst19 · 2012-04-20 01:54:04 0
  • The above command will send 4GB of data from one host to the next over the network, without consuming any unnecessary disk on either the client nor the host. This is a quick and dirty way to benchmark network speed without wasting any time or disk space. Of course, change the byte size and count as necessary. This command also doesn't rely on any extra 3rd party utilities, as dd, ssh, cat, /dev/zero and /dev/null are installed on all major Unix-like operating systems. Show Sample Output


    5
    dd if=/dev/zero bs=4096 count=1048576 | ssh user@host.tld 'cat > /dev/null'
    atoponce · 2010-06-08 18:49:51 5

  • 30
    sed -i 8d ~/.ssh/known_hosts
    prayer · 2010-07-10 14:22:34 1
  • traverses e.g. "/data/myhost1.com/myrsyncshare"; logs stderr and stdout. useful with cron.


    0
    for host in *; do { if [ -d $host ]; then { cd ${host}; for share in *; do { if [ -d $share ]; then { cd $share; rsync -av --delete rsyncuser@$host::$share . 2>../$share.err 1>../$share.log; cd ..; }; fi; }; done; cd ..; }; fi; }; done;
    c3w · 2010-03-11 19:54:31 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: