Watch who requests what page from apache logs

tail -f access_log | awk '{print $1 , $12}'
Use this command to watch apache access logs in real time to see what pages are getting hit.
Sample Output
127.0.0.1 "http://example.com/example-page.html"
127.0.0.1 "http://example.com/index.html"
127.0.0.1 "http://example.com/index.html"

0
By: tyzbit
2014-12-24 14:15:52

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  • The command will read the apache log file and fetch the virtual host requested and the number of requests.


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  • -n 9000 : Number of requests to perform for the benchmarking session -c 900 : Number of multiple requests to perform at a time Show Sample Output


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What Others Think

Please, correct to tail -f access.log | awk '{print $1 , $12}'
dvrts · 178 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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