tr -d "\"" < infile.csv > noquotes.csv

Remove all quotes from csv

I always forget this one and find all kinds of complex solutions on google. Also works great while piping data. ex. 'cat data | process-data | tr -d "\"" > processed-data-without-quotes'

0
By: UnklAdM
2015-09-11 23:41:48

These Might Interest You

  • Turns regular quotes into curly quotes, also converts hyphens to dashes using a heuristic and outputs the result as UTF-8, suitable to copy/paste into wordprocessor. requires: http://daringfireball.net/projects/smartypants/ (which does most of the work) (I renamed smartypants.pl to smartypants before adding it to my $PATH) Also requrires PHP with the multibyte module installed (its installed by default with PHP, but the sysadmin on one server I use disabled it... presumadly to increase performance or something).


    -2
    smartypants | php -r "echo mb_decode_numericentity(file_get_contents('php://stdin'),array(0x0000,0xFFFF,0x0000,0xFFFF),'UTF-8');"
    infinull · 2009-08-14 04:02:38 2
  • bash.org is a collection of funny quotes from IRC. WARNING: some of the quotes contain "adult" jokes... may be embarrassing if your boss sees them... Thanks to Chen for the idea and initial version! This script downloads a page with random quotes, filters the html to retrieve just one liners quotes and outputs the first one. Just barely under the required 255 chars :) Improvment: You can replace the head -1 at the end by: awk 'length($0)>0 {printf( $0 "\n%%\n" )}' > bash_quotes.txt which will separate the quotes with a "%" and place it in the file. and then: strfile bash_quotes.txt which will make the file ready for the fortune command and then you can: fortune bash_quotes.txt which will give you a random quote from those in the downloaded file. I download a file periodically and then use the fortune in .bashrc so I see a funny quote every time I open a terminal. Show Sample Output


    7
    curl -s http://bash.org/?random1|grep -oE "<p class=\"quote\">.*</p>.*</p>"|grep -oE "<p class=\"qt.*?</p>"|sed -e 's/<\/p>/\n/g' -e 's/<p class=\"qt\">//g' -e 's/<p class=\"qt\">//g'|perl -ne 'use HTML::Entities;print decode_entities($_),"\n"'|head -1
    Iftah · 2009-05-07 13:13:21 6
  • I had a file named " " (one space) and needed a way to see what the real filename was so I could remove it. sed to the rescue. Show Sample Output


    -2
    ls | sed 's,\(.*\),"\1",'
    randy909 · 2010-08-17 14:27:27 1
  • The ^$ within the quotes is a regular expression: ^=beginning of line, $=end of line, with no characters between.


    1
    grep -v "^$" filename > newfilename
    eastwind · 2009-09-24 12:21:43 1
  • It starts in the current working directory. It removes the empty directory and its ancestors (unless the ancestor contains other elements than the empty directory itself). It will print a failure message for every directory that isn't empty. This command handles correctly directory names containing single or double quotes, spaces or newlines. If you do not want only to remove all the ancestors, just use: find . -empty -type d -print0 | xargs -0 rmdir


    0
    find . -empty -type d -print0 | xargs -0 rmdir -p
    rafar · 2013-07-01 02:44:57 0
  • Turns out smacie.com has a text file containing every single one of the borat quotes, each one on a newline. This makes it very convenient, as this can be done without any sed-parsing, and uses less bandwitdth! Note that borate quotes are quite offensive, much more so than "fortunes-off"! Show Sample Output


    2
    curl -s "http://smacie.com/randomizer/borat.txt" | shuf -n 1 -
    benjabean1 · 2014-12-16 04:18:48 0

What Others Think

Nice. You don't even need the quotes around the quotes. tr -d \" < infile.csv > noquotes.csv . Using tr's the "right" solution here, but there's always room for sed :-) sed 's/"//g' infile.csv > noquotes.csv
flatcap · 139 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: