dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d'

List all the currently loaded old kernel packages, that is other than the active one


0
2015-09-19 00:39:48

These Might Interest You

  • Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules. Show Sample Output


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    lsmod | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs modinfo | egrep '^file|^desc|^dep' | sed -e'/^dep/s/$/\n/g'
    mohan43u · 2009-11-17 02:13:34 0
  • Liked command 4077 so I improved it, by doing all text manipulation with sed. "Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules." THX mohan43u Show Sample Output


    1
    lsmod | sed -e '1d' -e 's/\(\([^ ]*\) \)\{1\}.*/\2/' | xargs modinfo | sed -e '/^dep/s/$/\n/g' -e '/^file/b' -e '/^desc/b' -e '/^dep/b' -e d
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  • Install using yum install yum-utils Options include: --oldkernels Remove old kernel and kernel-devel packages --count=KERNELCOUNT Number of kernel packages to keep on the system (default 2) use package-cleanup --help for a complete list


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    /usr/bin/package-cleanup --oldkernels --count=3
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  • If you are doing some tests which require reboots (e. g. startup skripts, kernel module parameters, ...), this is very time intensive, if you have got a hardware with a long pre-boot phase due to hardware checks. At this time, kexec can help, which only restarts the kernel with all related stuff. First the kernel to be started is loaded, then kexec -e jumps up to start it. Is as hard as a reboot -f, but several times faster (e. g. 1 Minute instead of 12 on some servers here). Show Sample Output


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    /sbin/kexec -l /boot/$KERNEL --append="$KERNELPARAMTERS" --initrd=/boot/$INITRD; sync; /sbin/kexec -e
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  • Watch the temperatures of your CPU cores in real time at the command line. Press CONTROL+C to end. GORY DETAILS: Your computer needs to support sensors (many laptops, for example, do not). You'll need to install the lm-sensors package if it isn't already installed. And it helps to run the `sensors-detect` command to set up your sensor kernel modules first. At the very end of the sensors-detect interactive shell prompt, answer YES to add the new lines to the list of kernel modules loaded at boot. Show Sample Output


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    while :; do sensors|grep ^Core|while read x; do printf '% .23s\n' "$x"; done; sleep 1 && clear; done;
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  • 0
    lsmod | tail -n +2 | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs modinfo | egrep '^file|^desc|^dep' | sed -e'/^dep/s/$/\n/g'
    vlaad · 2012-09-03 17:59:49 0

What Others Think

For rpm-based systems: rpm -q kernel | grep -v $(uname -r)
flatcap · 139 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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