rpm -Va | grep -v "\.\.\.\.\.\.\.T"

Strip out time difference entries when verifying rpms on x86_64 RHEL systems


0
By: llama
2009-03-24 19:32:41

These Might Interest You


  • 0
    yum remove \*.i\?86
    niek · 2011-10-27 13:56:24 0
  • On RHEL, Fedora and CentOS systems, and maybe others, the sbin directories aren't in the user's $PATH. For those systems that use 'sudo', this can be inconvenient typing the full path all the time. As a result, you can easily take advantage of adding the sbin directories to your PATH by adding this simple line to you .zshrc.


    0
    path+=( /sbin /usr/sbin /usr/local/sbin ); path=( ${(u)path} );
    atoponce · 2009-10-31 02:32:25 0

  • 0
    yum remove `rpm -qa --qf "%{n}.%{arch}\n"|grep i386`
    rubiojr · 2011-10-26 07:02:24 0
  • Low on disk space? Check the largest installed RPMs for delete canditates. Show Sample Output


    2
    rpm -qa --qf '%{SIZE} %{NAME}\n' | sort -nr | nl | head -6 # six largest RPMs
    mpb · 2009-03-15 22:18:17 0
  • `blkid` is an interface to libuuid - it can read Device Mapper, EVMS, LVM, MD, and regular block devices. -c /dev/null - Do not use cached output from /etc/blkid.tab or /etc/blkid/blkid.tab (RHEL) -i - Display I/O Limits (aka I/O topology) information (not available in RHEL) -p - Low-level superblock probing mode (not available in RHEL) Show Sample Output


    2
    blkid -c /dev/null
    mhs · 2012-09-12 13:34:41 2
  • In pre-systemd systems, something like: "# grep sshd /var/log/messages" would display log events in /var/log/messages containing "sshd". # journalctl -u sshd --no-pager The above command displays similar results for systemd systems. (Note that this needs to be run with root permissions to access the log data.)


    2
    # journalctl -u sshd --no-pager # display sshd log entries
    mpb · 2015-10-15 08:48:47 2

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: