ls *.pdf | while read file; do newfile="${file##CS749__}"; mv "${file}" "${newfile}"; done;

Removing Prefix from File name

Removing Course name prefix added
Sample Output
Input:
CS749__10_simplify.pdf

Output:
10_simplify.pdf

1
2016-04-19 11:06:43

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What Others Think

Using the "newfile" variable *might* make this a little clear, but it's not necessary. Also, parsing ls output is generally a bad idea, e.g. whitespace can be lost. Finally ${file##...} will potentially remove MULTIPLE prefixes. I would be surprised if you need this. ${file#...} would be fine. . A better (more 'fu') command would be: for f in *.pdf; do mv "$f" "${f#CS749__}"; done;
flatcap · 108 weeks and 6 days ago
You should give a try to rename command. It enables, among others, the substitute command from vim and sed. Something like (I added ^ to the regexp as you're speaking about prefix : rename 's/^CS749__//g' * would do the job/
keltroth · 108 weeks and 6 days ago
agario · 95 weeks ago
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housecarbike · 44 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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