Slow down the screen output of a command

ls -lart|lolcat -a
(example above is the 'ls' command with reduced output speed)

4
By: knoppix5
2016-11-18 02:45:39
ls

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    AUTOSSH_POLL=1 autossh -M 21010 hostname -t 'screen -Dr'
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  • Errors in output don't matter. Stop recording: ctrl-c. Result playable with Flash too. IMPORTANT: Find a Pulse Audio device to capture from: pactl list | grep -A2 'Source #' | grep 'Name: ' | cut -d" " -f2 Show Sample Output


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    cvlc --input-slave pulse://<device> screen:// --screen-fps=15 --screen-top=0 --screen-left=0 --screen-width=640 --screen-height=480 --sout='#transcode{vcodec=FLV1,vb=1600,acodec=aac}:std{access=file,mux=ffmpeg{mux=flv},dst=viewport1.flv}'
    ysangkok · 2012-04-20 17:55:41 1
  • I often find myself wanting to open screen on whatever command I'm currently running. Unfortunately, opening a fresh screen session spawns a new bash session, which doesn't keep my history, so calling screen directly with the previous command is the only way to go.


    1
    screen !!
    bartonski · 2012-10-15 12:58:38 1
  • If you know the benefits of screen, then this might come in handy for you. Instead of ssh'ing into a machine and then running a screen command, this can all be done on one line instead. Just have the person on the machine your ssh'ing into run something like screen -S debug Then you would run ssh -t user@host screen -x debug and be attached to the same screen session.


    7
    ssh -t user@host screen -x <screen name>
    Dark006 · 2009-08-02 15:39:24 0

What Others Think

This would work as well slowoutput() { while read output; do echo "$output"; sleep 0.5; done <
snipertyler · 80 weeks and 5 days ago
Agree. There is not only one option. Comes in mind too: less -y 1
knoppix5 · 80 weeks and 5 days ago
Uh, this with 'less' behaves ugly. But there are some more: . ls -lart|sed 's/^/\f/g'|more . or . ls -lart|awk '{print $0 27;system ("sleep .5")}' . (can't be stopped with Ctrl+C)
knoppix5 · 80 weeks and 5 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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