Watch Processes with D status (sleep and wait for IO)

watch -n 1 "(ps aux | awk '\$8 ~ /D/ { print \$0 }')"

0
By: ara4sh
2017-04-15 10:39:02

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  • This is a more accurate way to watch the progress of a dd process. The $DDPID=$! is needed so that you don't get the PID of the sleep. The sleep 1 is needed because in my testing at least, if you run kill -USR1 against dd too quickly, it will kill it off instead of display the status. So you need to wait a second, probably so that it can configure itself to trap the USR1 signal. Show Sample Output


    4
    dd if=fromfile of=tofile & DDPID=$! ; sleep 1 ; while kill -USR1 $DDPID ; do sleep 5; done
    deltaray · 2010-01-12 15:01:44 1
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    0
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    colemar · 2014-10-22 06:31:47 0
  • In certain cases you mighy need to monitor the server load caused by certain process. For example HTTP, while stress testing apache using ab (apache benchmark) you may want to monitor the server status,load, # of spawned HTTP processes, # of established connections, # of connections in close wait state, apache memory footprint etc. Show Sample Output


    2
    watch -n1 "uptime && ps auxw|grep http|grep -v grep | grep -v watch|wc -l && netstat -ntup|grep :80 |grep ESTABLISHED|wc -l && netstat -ntup|grep :80|grep WAIT|wc -l && free -mo && ps -ylC httpd --sort:rss|tail -3|awk '{print \$8}'"
    rockon · 2012-06-06 12:12:10 1
  • Ummmm.. Saw that gem on some dead-head hippies VW bus at phish this summer.. It's actually one of my favorite ways of using bash, very clean. It shows what you can do with the cool advanced features like job control, redirection, combining commands that don't wait for each other, and the thing I like the most is the use of the ( ) to make this process heirarchy below, which comes in very handy when using fifos for adding optimization to your scripts or commands with similar acrobatics. F UID PID PPID WCHAN RSS PSR CMD 1 gplovr 30667 1 wait 1324 1 -bash 0 gplovr 30672 30667 - 516 3 \_ sleep 3 1 gplovr 30669 1 wait 1324 1 -bash 0 gplovr 30673 30669 - 516 0 \_ sleep 5 1 gplovr 30671 1 wait 1324 1 -bash 0 gplovr 30674 30671 - 516 1 \_ sleep 7 Show Sample Output


    -2
    S=$SSH_TTY && (sleep 3 && echo -n 'Peace... '>$S & ) && (sleep 5 && echo -n 'Love... '>$S & ) && (sleep 7 && echo 'and Intergalactic Happiness!'>$S & )
    AskApache · 2009-08-19 07:57:16 1

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