ac -p

Display time of accounts connection on a system

Works on CentOS ad OpenBSD too, display time of accounts connection on a system, -p option print individual user's statistics.
Sample Output
# ac -p
        nastic                               1.17
        root                                22.67
        total                               23.83

2
2009-04-29 16:24:07

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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