Follow the flow of a log file

tailf file.log
tailf same as tail -f follow the flow of a log file, showing it in real time to stdout.

5
2009-05-07 20:13:41

These Might Interest You

  • Go to "https://twitter.com/search/realtime?q=%23TeamFollowBack&src=hash" and then copy al the text on the page. If you scroll down the page will be bigger. Then put al the text in a text file called twit.txt If you follow the user there is a high probability the users give you follow back. To follow all the users you can use an iMacros script.


    -6
    for a in $(seq 5 8); do cat twit.txt | cut -d " " -f$a | grep "^@" | sort -u; done > followlst.txt
    xmuda · 2013-03-29 21:07:09 0
  • If you use 'tail -f foo.txt' and it becomes temporarily moved/deleted (ie: log rolls over) then tail will not pick up on the new foo.txt and simply waits with no output. 'tail -F' allows you to follow the file by it's name, rather than a descriptor. If foo.txt disappears, tail will wait until the filename appears again and then continues tailing.


    15
    tail -F file
    recursiverse · 2009-07-23 07:37:11 1
  • This command finds the 5 (-n5) most frequently updated logs in /var/log, and then does a multifile tail follow of those log files. Alternately, you can do this to follow a specific list of log files: sudo tail -n0 -f /var/log/{messages,secure,cron,cups/error_log} Show Sample Output


    5
    ls -drt /var/log/* | tail -n5 | xargs sudo tail -n0 -f
    kanaka · 2009-07-22 14:44:41 0
  • If /home/sonic/archive/ was a symlink to /backup/sonic/archive it would follow the links and give you the file listing. By default find will NOT follow symbolic links. The default behavior for the find command is to treat the symlinks as literal files. I discovered this when trying to write a script run via cron to delete files with a modification time older than X days. The easiest solution was to use: /usr/bin/find -L /home/sonic/archive -name '*gz' -type f -mtime +14 -exec rm '{}' \; Show Sample Output


    -1
    find -L /home/sonic/archive -name '*gz' -type f
    sonic · 2013-10-07 14:32:22 0

What Others Think

Where is the difference to tail -f ?
P17 · 472 weeks and 2 days ago
From the tailf manpage: tailf will print out the last 10 lines of a file and then wait for the file to grow. It is similar to tail -f but does not access the file when it is not growing. This has the side effect of not updating the access time for the file, so a filesystem flush does not occur periodically when no log activity is happening.
spatz · 472 weeks and 1 day ago
Nice
bwoodacre · 472 weeks ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: