screen -xR

Reconnect to screen without disconnecting other sessions

Have your screen session running in multiple places. (warning, things start to look weird if the terminal windows have different dimensions)

4
By: stuart
2009-02-05 22:22:10

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  • If you have many screen sessions, it can be difficult to find the id of the one you just detached from so you can re-attach using `screen -x -S ` Show Sample Output


    -1
    screen -ls | grep D
    peter4512 · 2012-03-01 14:05:40 0
  • I alias this as "tach": alias tach='screen -x `screen -ls | grep Detached | cut -c -10`' If you have several detached sessions it will just grab the first one. If you're running nested screens you can open new outer windows and run tach repeatedly to grab all the detached sessions into that one. Show Sample Output


    -3
    screen -x `screen -ls | grep Detached | cut -c -10`
    peter4512 · 2012-03-01 14:13:09 3
  • There was another line that was dependent on having un-named screen sessions. This just wouldn't do. This one works no matter what the name is. A possible improvement would be removing the perl dependence, but that doesn't effect me.


    2
    for i in `screen -ls | perl -ne'if(/^\s+\d+\.([^\s]+)/){print $1, " "}'`; do gnome-terminal -e "screen -x $i"; done
    hank · 2009-04-25 22:39:24 1
  • Configures screen to always display the clock in the last line (has to be configured only once). After that you not only have got the possibility to detach sessions and run them in background, but also have got a nice clock permanently on your screen.


    4
    echo 'hardstatus alwayslastline " %d-%m-%y %c:%s | %w"' >> $HOME/.screenrc; screen
    olorin · 2011-02-16 08:04:56 0
  • A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling. This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script. . The logs and the screen session are stored on the server. This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine. . . Requirements: * Log sessions on a remote server * Transparent - nothing extra to type * No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand . Features: * Function wrapper delegating to ssh - so nothing to remember - uses .ssh/config as expected - passes your command line option to ssh * Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server * Uses screen(1), so is: - detachable - re-attachable - shareable * Records session using script(1) * Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace L="$HOME" # local variable L="\$HOME" # server variable L="some space" . Limitations: * Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server) . . The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server. Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session. If you want to connect/share another's session simply run: USER=bob ssh root@server . The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum. A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin): https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714 . If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to: ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";} Show Sample Output


    3
    ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
    flatcap · 2015-10-14 13:14:29 1

  • 0
    for s in /tmp/screens/S-$USER/*; do screen -r "$(basename "$s")"; done
    dgbaley27 · 2012-08-23 16:16:54 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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