Change all the limits that can be changed to unlimited

for fl in $(ulimit -a | awk '{ gsub(":", "", $1); print $1}'); do ulimit $fl unlimited; done
Death to the user limits!

0
By: untoreh
2017-12-29 05:11:06

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    2
    echo "ulimit `ulimit -a|sed -e 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/'|tr "\n" ' '`"
    AskApache · 2010-03-12 06:46:54 1
  • When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process. Show Sample Output


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    askedrelic · 2009-11-04 01:41:33 0
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    0
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