Find if the command has an alias

type -all command
Sample Output
dusn is aliased to `du -ksc * .[A-Za-z]* | sort -n'

16
By: marssi
2009-05-27 02:57:32

These Might Interest You

  • 5 helpful aliases for using the which utility, specifically for the GNU which (2.16 tested) that is included in coreutils. Which is run first for a command. Same as type builtin minus verbosity alias which='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias' Which (a)lias alias whicha='command alias | command which --read-alias' Which (f)unction alias whichf='command declare -f | command which --read-functions' Which e(x)ecutable file in PATH alias whichx='command which' Which (all) alias, function, builtin, and files in PATH alias whichall='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias -a' # From my .bash_profile http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    alias whichall='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias -a'
    AskApache · 2010-11-18 03:32:04 5
  • By putting the "-not \( -name .svn -prune \)" in the very front of the "find" command, you eliminate the .svn directories in your find command itself. No need to grep them out. You can even create an alias for this command: alias svn_find="find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \)" Now you can do things like svn_find -mtime -3


    8
    find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \) -type f -print0 | xargs --null grep <searchTerm>
    qazwart · 2009-07-08 20:08:05 4
  • Alias a single character 'b' to move to parent directory. Put it into your .bashrc or .profile file. Using "cd .." is one of the most repetitive sequence of characters you'll in the command line. Bring it down to two keys 'b' and 'enter'. It stands for "back" Also useful to have multiple: alias b='cd ../' alias bb='cd ../../' alias bbb='cd ../../../' alias bbbb='cd ../../../../' Show Sample Output


    1
    alias b='cd ../'
    deshawnbw · 2012-04-01 06:04:45 1
  • An alias cannot be executed as command in a find -exec line. This form will trick the command line and let you do the job.


    5
    find . -exec `alias foo | cut -d"'" -f2` {} \;
    ztank1013 · 2011-10-05 08:41:31 4

What Others Think

You could try this to see if any other aliases use a command: alias | grep command Also, if you want to use an UN-aliased version of the command, put a backslash \ in front of it, e.g. \ls (this mean run a normal /bin/ls)
flatcap · 472 weeks and 6 days ago
or command ls Has the same effect.
DaveQB · 472 weeks and 6 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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