ifconfig eth0 down hw ether (newmacaddresshere) && ifconfig eth0 up && ifconfig eth0 (newipaddresshere) netmask 255.255.255.0 up && /bin/hostname (newhostnamehere)

Mac, ip, and hostname change - sweet!

The command above has been changed due to very good constructive criticism - thanks x 2! This command can be used after acquiring mac's, ip's and hostname's or any of the above from a freshly scanned LAN. User must be root, and remember to change your settings on your network managing software manually (Fedc10 NetworkManager Applet 0.7.1 is mine) instead of 'auto DHCP'. You can also substitute eth0 for wlan0 etc - be good and ENJOY!

-3
2009-06-04 20:25:49

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    4
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What Others Think

The pipes don't do anything, they should be semicolons.
bwoodacre · 467 weeks and 5 days ago
Better off use && instead of the semicolons to make sure that the previous command completed.
st0p · 467 weeks and 4 days ago

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