Create a simple video contact sheet using the vcs bash script

vcs -c 3 -H 220 -n 24 -dt -ds -dp -j --anonymous -O bg_heading=black -O bg_sign=black -O fg_heading=white -O fg_heading=white -O fg_sign=white -O fg_title=white -O font_heading=DejaVu-Sans-Bold -O quality=70
Assumes you've downloaded Toni Corvera's vcs script (http://p.outlyer.net/vcs), have it in your PATH, and have installed the script's dependencies. Generates a video contact sheet of 24 thumbnails and 3 thumbnails per column. The bold font and white-on-black color scheme keeps the text readable at the chosen 70% JPEG compression quality, which keeps the file size at a manageable level. You can go even lower with the quality and get a good looking result.

2
By: Negate
2018-06-06 00:49:25

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