Extract a Zip File from STDOUT with the Jar Command

cat foo.zip | jar xv
Plain old `unzip` won't unzip output coming from STDOUT the ZIP file format includes a directory (index) at the end of the archive. This directory says where, within the archive each file is located and thus allows for quick, random access, without reading the entire archive. This would appear to pose a problem when attempting to read a ZIP archive through a pipe, in that the index is not accessed until the very end and so individual members cannot be correctly extracted until after the file has been entirely read and is no longer available. As such it appears unsurprising that most ZIP decompressors simply fail when the archive is supplied through a pipe. The directory at the end of the archive is not the only location where file meta information is stored in the archive. In addition, individual entries also include this information in a local file header, for redundancy purposes. From the `jar` manpage: > The jar command is a general-purpose archiving and compression tool, based on ZIP and the ZLIB compression format. JAR is smart enough to know how to handle these local file headers when the index is unavailable when reading through the pipe. (Most of the explanation in this description is taken from https://serverfault.com/a/589528/314226 , though they recommend using `bsdtar`, but that is not always available on systems)
Sample Output
?? cat foo.zip | jar xv 
extracted: foo/bae.txt
extracted: foo/bar.txt
extracted: foo/baz.txt
extracted: foo/boo.txt

0
By: bbbco
2019-01-14 22:08:19

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