date --date="1 fortnight ago"

date offset calculations

The date command does offset calculations nicely, handles concepts like "a month" as you'd expect, and is good for offsets of at least 100M years in either direction.
Sample Output
Fri Jan 23 14:53:27 CST 2009

3
By: mkc
2009-02-06 20:57:59

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    -1
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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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