copying data with cpio

find ./source -depth -print | cpio -cvo> /destination/source_data.cpio; cd /destination; cpio -icvmdI ./source_data.cpio; rm -rf ./source_data.cpio
Copy data to the destination using commands such as cpio (recommended), tar, rsync, ufsdump, or ufsrestore. Example: Let the source directory be /source, and let the destination directory be /destination. # cd /source # cd .. # find ./source -depth -print | cpio -cvo> /destination/source_data.cpio # cd /destination # cpio -icvmdI ./source_data.cpio # rm -rf ./source_data.cpio

0
By: mnikhil
2009-02-07 18:51:49

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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