sort -n -t . -k 1,1 -k 2,2 -k 3,3 -k 4,4 /file/of/ip/addresses

Sort IP addresses

Sort IP address by order

2
2009-02-08 05:24:08

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  • This command is much quicker than the alternative of "sort | uniq -c | sort -n". Show Sample Output


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    1
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