Remove all files but one starting with a letter(s)

rm -rf [a-bd-zA-Z0-9]* c[b-zA-Z0-9]*
Remove everything in current directory except files starting with "ca".

1
By: arcege
2009-09-15 14:22:56

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    < /etc/passwd sed -n "/^bin:/,/^lp:/p"
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  • This uses some tricks I found while reading the bash man page to enumerate and display all the current environment variables, including those not listed by the 'env' command which according to the bash docs are more for internal use by BASH. The main trick is the way bash will list all environment variable names when performing expansion on ${!A*}. Then the eval builtin makes it work in a loop. I created a function for this and use it instead of env. (by aliasing env). This is the function that given any parameters lists the variables that start with it. So 'aae B' would list all env variables starting wit B. And 'aae {A..Z} {a..z}' would list all variables starting with any letter of the alphabet. And 'aae TERM' would list all variables starting with TERM. aae(){ local __a __i __z;for __a in "$@";do __z=\${!${__a}*};for __i in `eval echo "${__z}"`;do echo -e "$__i: ${!__i}";done;done; } And my printenv replacement is: alias env='aae {A..Z} {a..z} "_"|sort|cat -v 2>&1 | sed "s/\\^\\[/\\\\033/g"' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    for _a in {A..Z} {a..z};do _z=\${!${_a}*};for _i in `eval echo "${_z}"`;do echo -e "$_i: ${!_i}";done;done|cat -Tsv
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What Others Think

(in bash and zsh) You can negate character classes so that you don't have to list out all alphanumerics: rm -rf [^c]* c[^a]* but for longer prefix names you could write out the longer command "rm -rf [^c]* c[^a]* ca[^t]*, or just use a glob/regex in find: find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -not -name "ca*" -delete
bwoodacre · 457 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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