seq 10 |xargs -n1 echo Printing line

Creating sequence of number with text

Nice command to create a list, you can create too with for command, but this is so faster.
Sample Output
jeju:[xxxx] > seq 10 |xargs -n1 echo Printing line
Printing line 1
Printing line 2
Printing line 3
Printing line 4
Printing line 5
Printing line 6
Printing line 7
Printing line 8
Printing line 9
Printing line 10
jeju:[xxxx] >

0
By: Waldirio
2009-10-15 11:05:35

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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