dd if=/dev/<device location> | gzip -c /<path to backup location>/<disk image name>.img.gz

Compress and Backup a disk image


-3
2009-11-10 22:57:51

These Might Interest You

  • This will create an exact duplicate image of your hard drive that you can then restore by simply reversing the "if" & "of" locations. sudo dd if=/media/disk/backup/sda.backup of=/dev/sda Alternatively, you can use an SSH connection to do your backups: dd if=/dev/sda | ssh user@ssh.server.com dd of=~/backup/sda.backup


    15
    sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/media/disk/backup/sda.backup
    bandit36 · 2009-02-27 20:23:37 2
  • Change /dev/sda with the Disk or partition you want to back-up To restore use: dd if=~/backup-disk-YY-MM-DD.img of=/dev/sda Once again change /dev/sda accordingly Source: http://www.go2linux.org/linux/2010/09/small-tip-back-disks-clone-hard-disk-773


    -4
    dd if=/dev/sda of=~/backup-disk-YY-MM-DD.img
    unixmonkey12135 · 2010-09-14 11:14:14 0
  • Suppose you made a backup of your hard disk with dd: dd if=/dev/sda of=/mnt/disk/backup.img This command enables you to mount a partition from inside this image, so you can access your files directly. Substitute PARTITION=1 with the number of the partition you want to mount (returned from sfdisk -d yourfile.img). Show Sample Output


    6
    INFILE=/path/to/your/backup.img; MOUNTPT=/mnt/foo; PARTITION=1; mount "$INFILE" "$MOUNTPT" -o loop,offset=$[ `/sbin/sfdisk -d "$INFILE" | grep "start=" | head -n $PARTITION | tail -n1 | sed 's/.*start=[ ]*//' | sed 's/,.*//'` * 512 ]
    Alanceil · 2009-03-06 21:29:13 3
  • Assuming we have a disk image, ie. created by dd if=/dev/sda of=image.dd we can check the image's partition layout with fdisk -ul image.dd then, we substitute "x" with starting sector of the partition we want to mount. This example assumes that the disk uses 512 B sectors


    4
    mount -o loop,offset=$((512*x)) /path/to/dd/image /mount/path
    rocku · 2009-11-25 15:49:30 1
  • Create an image of "device" and send it to another machine through the network ("target" and "port" sets the ip and port the stream will be sent to), outputting a progress bar On the machine that will receive, compress and store the file, use: nc -l -p <port> | 7z a <filename> -si -m0=lzma2 -mx=9 -ms=on Optionally, add the -v4g switch at the end of the line in order to split the file every 4 gigabytes (or set another size: accepted suffixes are k, m and g). The file will be compressed using 7z format, lzma2 algorithm, with maximum compression level and solid file activated. The compression stage will be executed on the machine which will store the image. It was planned this way because the processor on that machine was faster, and being on a gigabit network, transfering the uncompressed image wasn't much of a problem.


    8
    dd if=<device> | pv | nc <target> <port>
    quitaiskiluisf · 2012-01-27 18:37:36 2
  • This command will nicely dump a filesystem to STDOUT, compress it, encrypt it with the gpg key of your choice, throttle the the data stream to 60kb/s and finally use ssh to copy the contents to an image on a remote machine. Show Sample Output


    2
    nice -n19 dump -0af - /<filesystem> -z9|gpg -e -r <gpg key id>|cstream -v 1 -t 60k|ssh <user@host> "cat > backup.img"
    din7 · 2009-10-29 18:27:25 0

What Others Think

If you're going to save disk images, try and empty the unused space first. Mount the disk and cd into it, then do something simple like: cat /dev/zero > file; sync; rm file; This'll save a lot of space when you make your image.
flatcap · 444 weeks and 6 days ago

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