Watch a TiVo File On Your Computer

curl -s -c /tmp/cookie -k -u tivo:$MAK --digest http://$tivo/download/$filename | tivodecode -m $MAK -- - | mplayer - -cache-min 50 -cache 65536
Watch a TiVo file on your computer.

0
2009-11-11 23:32:23

These Might Interest You

  • Download the last show on your TiVo DVR. Replace $MAK with your MAK see https://www3.tivo.com/tivo-mma/showmakey.do Replace $tivo with your TiVo's IP


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    curl -s -c /tmp/cookie -k -u tivo:$MAK --digest "$(curl -s -c /tmp/cookie -k -u tivo:$MAK --digest https://$tivo/nowplaying/index.html | sed 's;.*<a href="\([^"]*\)">Download MPEG-PS</a>.*;\1;' | sed 's|\&amp;|\&|')" | tivodecode -m $MAK -- - > tivo.mpg
    matthewbauer · 2009-09-26 03:00:46 2
  • Fully recharge your computer battery and start this script. It will create or clean the file named battery.txt, print a start on it and every minute it will append a time stamp to it. Batteries last few hours, and each hour will have 60 lines of time stamping. Really good for assuring the system was tested in real life with no surprises. The last time stamp inside the battery.txt file is of interest. It is the time the computer went off, as the battery was dead! Turn on your computer after that, on AC power of course, and open battery.txt. Read the first and last time stamps and now you really know if you can trust your computer sensors. If you want a simple line of text inside the battery.txt file, use this: watch -n 60 'date > battery.txt' The time of death will be printed inside Show Sample Output


    0
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    m33600 · 2009-10-18 07:00:26 0
  • Exactly what the summary says. This command will connect to another computer via SSH, and stream audio from your computer's microphone to the other computer's speakers. Use it like an intercom.


    0
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    while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
    evil · 2010-06-13 18:45:02 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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