MyIps(){ echo -e "local:\n$(ifconfig $1 | grep -oP 'inet (add?r:)?\K(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}')\n\npublic:\n$(curl -s sputnick-area.net/ip)"; }

Show local/public IP adresses with or without interface argument using a shell function for Linux and MacOsX

Like the tiltle said, you can use an argument too ( the interface ) MyIps eth0 will show only the IP of this interface and the public IP ( tested with Linux ) You can add that function in ~/.bashrc, then . ~/.bashrc Now you are ready to call this function in all your terms...
Sample Output
local:
10.0.0.1
10.0.0.221
192.168.0.1

public:
212.34.55.218

1
By: sputnick
2009-12-06 22:52:31

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What Others Think

This works on OS X (unlike almost all the other IP address commands that use ifconfig here) with the following changes: 1) change 'inet addr:' to 'inet ' and 2) ifconfig uses 'enX' rather than 'ethX' on linux. So the command would be: echo -e "local:\n$(ifconfig en0 | grep -oP 'inet \K(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}')\n\npublic:\n$(curl -s sputnick-area.net/ip)"; to check the first ethernet IP address.
drewk · 441 weeks and 2 days ago
Ok, thanks for your contribution. Here is the good one, for both MacOsX and Linux : ifconfig $1 | grep -oP 'inet (addr:)?\K(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}' 1 is an optionnal interface. That must works with or without.
polo · 441 weeks and 2 days ago
So in complete : MyIps(){ echo -e "local:\n$(ifconfig $1 | grep -oP 'inet (addr:)?\K(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}')\n\npublic:\n$(curl -s sputnick-area.net/ip)"; }
polo · 441 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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