Count files created by date/modification

find . -type f -exec stat \{\} \; | grep Modify: | awk '{a[$2]++}END{for(i in a){print i " : " a[i] }}' | sort

0
By: pepin
2010-01-23 07:55:16

These Might Interest You

  • Increase the modification date for the files selected with the find command.


    1
    find . -type f | while read line; do NEW_TS=`date -d@$((\`stat -c '%Y' $line\` + <seconds> )) '+%Y%m%d%H%M.%S'`; touch -t $NEW_TS ${line}; done
    angleto · 2010-11-18 14:03:32 0
  • remove files with access time older than a given date. If you want to remove files with a given modification time replace %A@ with %T@. Use %C@ for the modification time. The time is expressed in epoc but is easy to use any other format. Show Sample Output


    -2
    find <dir> -printf '%p : %A@\n' | awk '{FS=" : " ; if($2 < <time in epoc> ) print $1 ;}' | xargs rm --verbose -fr ;
    angleto · 2009-11-20 16:31:58 6
  • With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins? touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me List all directories created since last week? touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package. Show Sample Output


    5
    date -d '1 day ago'; date -d '11 hour ago'; date -d '2 hour ago - 3 minute'; date -d '16 hour'
    LrdShaper · 2009-06-01 10:41:56 3
  • The command renames all files in a certain directory. Renaming them to their date of creation using EXIF. If you're working with JPG that contains EXIF data (ie. from digital camera), then you can use following to get the creation date instead of stat. * Since not every file has exif data, we want to check that dst is valid before doing the rest of commands. * The output from exif has a space, which is a PITA for filenames. Use sed to replace with '-'. * Note that I use 'echo' before the mv to test out my scripts. When you're confident that it's doing the right thing, then you can remove the 'echo'... you don't want to end up like the guy that got all the files blown away. Credits: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4710753/rename-files-according-to-date-created Show Sample Output


    1
    for i in *.jpg; do dst=$(exif -t 0x9003 -m $i ) && dst_esc=$(echo $dst | sed 's/ /-/g' ) && echo mv $i $dst_esc.jpg ; done
    klisanor · 2012-05-02 07:23:38 1

What Others Think

does not work
unixmonkey7859 · 438 weeks and 1 day ago
nice, you can do this without the call to stat and grep --making it magnitudes faster for big directory trees: find . -type f -printf "%TY/%Tm/%Td\n" | awk '{a[$0]++}END{for(i in a){print i " : " a[i] }}' | sort You inspired me to write a script which counts the files by year, year/mo, and year/month/day: http://sente.cc/count-by-date.sh
sente · 431 weeks and 3 days ago
the file's moved to http://sente.cc/misc/count-by-date.sh
sente · 420 weeks and 3 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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