/bin/bash echo -n "Let's POST MORE, PLEASE!"

Getting involved!!

I absolutely love this website, and appreciate every contribution. This is the first place I go when I'm stuck, you all have some great ideas. But contributions seem to be slipping a little. If all of us could contribute more code from time to time, this site would be absolutely incredible. Since I'm a relative newcomer to commandline-fu, I don't have the knowledge to contribute much, but I will do what I can.

-15
2010-02-05 18:52:45

These Might Interest You

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    0
    head -1 file.csv | tr ',' '\n' | tr -d " " | awk '{print NR,$0}'
    neomefistox · 2015-08-26 05:46:15 1
  • Can be used for other commands as well, replace rm with ls. It is easy to make this shorter but if the filenames involved have spaces, you will need to do use find's "-print0" option in conjunction with xargs's "-0" option. Otherwise the shell that xargs uses to execute the "rm" command line will treat the space as a token separator, thereby treating the name as two (or more) names. Show Sample Output


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    find . -name 'junkfiles-*' -print0 | xargs -0 rm
    kancer · 2009-03-26 15:38:42 2
  • This command will add up RAM usage of all processes whose name contains "java" and output the sum of percentages in HRF. Also, unlike the original #15430, it wont fail on processes with a usage of >9.9%. Pleases note that this command wont work reliably in use cases where a significant portion of processes involved are using less than 0.1% of RAM, because they will be counted as "0", even though a great number of them could add up to significant amounts. Show Sample Output


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    ps -eo pmem,comm | grep java | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum " % of RAM"}'
    bugmenot · 2016-02-10 09:00:56 0
  • Depending on the installation only certain of these man pages are installed. 12 is left out on purpose because ISO/IEC 8859-12 does not exist. To also access those manpages that are not installed use opera (or any other browser that supports all the character sets involved) to display online versions of the manpages hosted at kernel.org: for i in $(seq 1 11) 13 14 15 16; do opera http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/online/pages/man7/iso_8859-$i.7.html; done


    -2
    for i in $(seq 1 11) 13 14 15 16; do man iso-8859-$i; done
    penpen · 2009-03-31 19:40:15 1
  • This command will copy a folder tree (keeping the parent folders) through ssh. It will: - compress the data - stream the compressed data through ssh - decompress the data on the local folder This command will take no additional space on the host machine (no need to create compressed tar files, transfer it and then delete it on the host). There is some situations (like mirroring a remote machine) where you simply cant wait for a huge time taking scp command or cant compress the data to a tarball on the host because of file system space limitation, so this command can do the job quite well. This command performs very well mainly when a lot of data is involved in the process. If you copying a low amount of data, use scp instead (easier to type) Show Sample Output


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    ssh <host> 'tar -cz /<folder>/<subfolder>' | tar -xvz
    polaco · 2009-11-10 20:06:47 4
  • We all know... nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do cachedel <OneSingleFile>   To check the cache status of a file, do cachestats <OneSingleFile>


    21
    nocache <I/O-heavy-command>
    michelsberg · 2013-05-21 15:15:05 3

What do you think?

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