find ${PATH//:/ } -name \*bash\*

Search $PATH for a command or something similar

Searches your $PATH for whatever you substitute for bash, though not sure if this will work if you substitute a different shell for bash!
Sample Output
/bin/bash
/usr/bin/rbash
/usr/bin/bashbug

6
2010-03-16 04:26:27

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  • In this example, the command will recursively find files (-type f) under /some/path, where the path ends in .mp3, case insensitive (-iregex). It will then output a single line of output (-print0), with results terminated by a the null character (octal 000). Suitable for piping to xargs -0. This type of output avoids issues with garbage in paths, like unclosed quotes. The tr command then strips away everything but the null chars, finally piping to wc -c, to get a character count. I have found this very useful, to verify one is getting the right number of before you actually process the results through xargs or similar. Yes, one can issue the find without the -print0 and use wc -l, however if you want to be 1000% sure your find command is giving you the expected number of results, this is a simple way to check. The approach can be made in to a function and then included in .bashrc or similar. e.g. count_chars() { tr -d -c "$1" | wc -c; } In this form it provides a versatile character counter of text streams :) Show Sample Output


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    -3
    set -o vi
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What Others Think

It works as is in ksh-93 (don't know about others) and if you do setopt shwordsplit it will work in zsh. For csh: find `echo $PATH | sed 's/:/ /g'` -name \*bash\*
dennisw · 426 weeks and 3 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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