bash-quine

s='s=\47%s\47; printf "$s" "$s"'; printf "$s" "$s"
this command prints itself out. it doesn't need to be stored in a file and it isn't as easy as echo $BASH_COMMAND for information on quines see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quine_(computing)

4
By: fpunktk
2010-05-09 16:52:58

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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