commentate specified line of a file

sed -i '<line_no>s/\(.*\)/#\1/' <testfile>
used when modify several configuration files with a single command
Sample Output
no output

1
By: Sunng
2010-07-05 08:19:44
sed

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  • see sample output Show Sample Output


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What Others Think

You can cut the capturing group by using: sed -i '<line_no>s/^/#/' <testfile>
unixmonkey10680 · 415 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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